Two Brothers Talking: A Running Dialogue on the Incarnation and Being Black, Part 4

The essence of being incarnational, in a system that practices such heinous oppression, would appear to be asinine. The missional ethos of coming to a place that has no perimeters and no appreciation for life registers as blatant stupidity. Suffering in such as place would be and is inevitable – (a)merica is just that type of place. A place where black folks experience high levels of suffering without the benefit of promoting privilege to soften the impact of such suffering. It is within the incarnation, where we can see God’s love for a people that consistently reject God.

I return back to the thought that the incarnation is dangerous. The incarnation pushes the oppressed to love people who will not return that love back to them. It is then, that we can say that the incarnation is a sacrifice predicated upon love, still extremely dangerous but promulgating robust love. Black folks in (a)merica extend this type of love every day, in a world where systemic racism has become the norm. We are incarnated into a system that does not play by a fair set of rules, but expects us to be satisfied that we are just able to be in the game.

The incarnation for the oppressed and those in the margins of society has the potential of being imprisonment. The good news is that Jesus did not work from this perspective. He worked from the perspective that the incarnation would benefit the world regardless if the world wanted it or not. The “word becoming flesh” (John 1:14) should revolutionized how we understand love. The incarnation becomes a radical move of love with major implications that transformed the entire world. Leaving privilege to endure suffering does not constitute intelligence but it sure does highlight love in a special way.    

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Late Night Reflection of the Gospel

The implicit search for truth is an uncanny presentation of courage. One must muster the power to see past their own myopic point of tension in order to develop a plan of change. It is change that we struggle with not difference. Change requires a total rebuilding of what we have held on to for so long while difference recalls upon past or present realities that will inform. Change calls for reformation instead of acceptance. For most it is easy to accept people but it is hard to change ones heart about what they have done. The old cliché, “Love the sinner, hate the sin” is parenthetically used to soften the ugliness that we harbor within our Christianized hearts.

The body of Christ has mangled the relational aspects of the Gospel and pawn them off as cheap jewelry. We have forgotten how to love with unadulterated, fierce intensity but replaced it with rhetorical sidesteps of utopia – “skubala.” The Gospel presents love with a captive freedom that harnesses beauty. It invites us all to the table of the Eucharist/Communion with the intention of robbing us of our pride, misconduct and hatred in order to pollute us with sharing, honesty and love. It is the Gospel that renders us to places where we may not understand but allows us to wrestle with the Spirit of God to unpack our confusion.

The body of Christ has conflated the Gospel with self-righteousness only to find that they are violently incompatible. The Gospel is only suitable for a perichoretic situation that represents community with high awareness. The importance of self is lost in the push to secure love for all. There is no self-identification due to the overshadowing pursuit of community –no one is free until everyone is free. If we lived within that frame of thought greed, hunger, and racism would be wiped out by the next day.

That is the Gospel –the anomaly of the church.